In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms
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In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Glenn Research Center, Available from NASA Center for Aerospace Information in [Cleveland, Ohio], Hanover, MD .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ball bearings.,
  • Lubrication systems.,
  • Porosity.,
  • Thermal expansion.,
  • Long duration space flight.,
  • Lubricants.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMario Marchetti ... [et al.].
SeriesNASA/TM -- 2002-211706., NASA technical memorandum -- 211706.
ContributionsMarchetti, M. 1943-, NASA Glenn Research Center.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18215627M

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In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms (OCoLC) Microfiche version: In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors. In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms (OCoLC) Online version: Marchetti, Mario. In-situ, on-demand lubrication system for space mechanisms (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors. In-situ, On-demand Lubrication System for Space Mechanisms By Mario Marchetti, Mark J. Jansen, Roamer E. Predmore, Jr. William R. Jones and Stephen V. Pepper Abstract. In-Situ, On-Demand Lubrication System for Space Mechanisms Mario Marchctti,* William R. Jones, Jr., and Stephen V. Pepper National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center Cleveland, Ohio Mark J. Jansen SEST, Inc. Middlcburg Heights, Ohio Roamer E. Prcdmorc National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

On-Demand Lubrication System for Space. System for Space Mechanism s Using a V acuum. Evaluation of an In-Situ Liquid Lubrication System for Space Mechanisms Using . Jansen, M. J., Jones, W. R., Pepper, S. V. Evaluation of an in-situ, liquid lubrication system for space mechanisms using a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. In Proceedings of the ASME/STLE Joint Conference, Cancun, Mexico, October Google Scholar. Many moving mechanical assemblies (MMAs) for space applications rely on a small, initial charge of lubricant for the entire mission lifetime, often in excess of five years. In many cases, the premature failure of a lubricated component can result in mission failure. If lubricant could be re-supplied to the contact in-situ, the life of the MMA could be extended. It is seen that for Wear; 5 () LUBRICATION IN SPACE VEHICLES these, the loss rate may be equivalent to only 10 to thousandths of an inch per year when directly exposed to vacuum and at elevated temperatures, unusual con- ditions for almost any bearing system contemplated.

Both pressure-dependent and speed dependent friction behaviors were studied. Wear tracks were analyzed in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy and ex situ with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The friction coefficient fell from to as the gas pressure rose to Pa, then remained low when the gas was. Command Lubrication System (CLS): The command lubrication system [3,13] is an active lubrication system developed for the supplementary lubrication of high speed mechanisms requiring remote lubrication. The CLS consists of a compression type metallic bellows of swept volume approximately cc, which acts as. In recent decades, tribology field has seen a great interest in friction and wear processes occurring at the micro- and nanoscale. This interest has led to the development of a new branch of tribology focusing on the small scale phenomena – the development of this field, it became clear that the mysteries of lubrication, friction and wear at the macroscopic level can be. The success of any satellite mission largely depends upon the performance of the attitude control systems such as gyroscopes and momentum/reaction wheels. The required life and performance quality of these rotating mechanisms are ensured by the selection of bearings and its lubrication. The design and development of lubrication system to meet the long-term uninterrupted performance is a.